WINONA, Minn. — Dr. Eleonore Stump of Saint Louis University will discuss “Temperance: Gifts/Fruits of the Holy Spirit” as the fourth presenter in Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota’s Cardinal Virtue Series on Thursday, April 25.

The event will begin at 7 p.m. and will be held in the Science and Learning Center (Room 200) on the university’s Winona Campus, 700 Terrace Heights. A reception will follow.

Speakers and topics selected for the Cardinal Virtue presentations have been chosen to create thought-provoking dialogue. Dr. Stump is the Robert J. Henle Professor of Philosophy at Saint Louis University, where she has taught since 1992. She is also Honorary Professor at Wuhan University and at the Logos Institute, St. Andrews, and she is a Professorial Fellow at Australian Catholic University. She has published extensively in philosophy of religion, contemporary metaphysics, and medieval philosophy. Her books include her major study Aquinas (Routledge, 2003), her extensive treatment of the problem of evil, Wandering in Darkness: Narrative and the Problem of Suffering (Oxford, 2010), and her far-reaching examination of human redemption, Atonement (Oxford, 2018). She has given the Gifford Lectures (Aberdeen, 2003), the Wilde lectures (Oxford, 2006), the Stewart lectures (Princeton, 2009) and the Stanton lectures (Cambridge, 2018). She is past president of the Society of Christian Philosophers, the American Catholic Philosophical Association, and the American Philosophical Association, Central Division; and she is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Cardinal Virtue presentations are thematically centered around the virtues of courage (fortitude), justice, prudence (practical wisdom), and temperance.

Visit smumn.edu/cvrsvp to RSVP. Questions about this or any of the Cardinal Virtues presentations may be directed to Saint Mary’s University’s Office of Mission at 507-457-1646.

The Cardinal Virtues

Courage (Fortitude) moderates those desires that prevent us from undertaking more daunting, difficult tasks — even allowing us to endure pain and discomfort when necessary in pursuit of truth and good.

Justice is a sustained or constant willingness to extend to each person what he or she deserves in relation to what is truly good for that individual and having both community and individual elements related to it.

Prudence (Practical Wisdom) is an intellectual aptitude that enables us to make judgments that are consonant with our proper end as human beings.

Temperance, in a general sense, denotes a kind of moderation common to every moral virtue and is directed to the good.

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